{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 1771, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/1771", "Disp_Access_No" : "P1962.9", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1815-1816 (p. 1905)", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1815", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1816", "Disp_Title" : "Modo con que los antiguos españoles cazaban los toros á caballo en el campo [The Way in Which the Ancient Spaniards Hunted Bulls on Horseback in the Open Country], plate 1 from La Tauromaquia", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Modo con que los antiguos españoles cazaban los toros á caballo en el campo [The Way in Which the Ancient Spaniards Hunted Bulls on Horseback in the Open Country], plate 1 from La Tauromaquia", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Francisco de Goya y Lucientes", "Sort_Artist" : "Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de", "Disp_Dimen" : "25.7 cm x 35.85 cm (10 1/8 in. x 14 1/8 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "25.7 cm", "Disp_Width" : "35.85 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "Sheet", "Medium" : "Etching, burnished aquatint and drypoint", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Etching, burnished aquatint and drypoint", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In 1816, Goya announced the publication of “thirty-three prints that represent different maneuvers and positions in the art of contesting with bulls.” La Tauromaquia––The Bullfight––presents some of the great figures and moments of Spain’s national pastime. Goya’s choice of subject was guided by the poet Don Nicoás Fernandez de Moratín’s brief history of bullfighting, published in Madrid in 1777, and by a manual attributed to the most famous matador of the time, Pepe Illo, published in Cádiz in 1796. While the intention and the imagery of the series are the most conventional of Goya’s print series, the Tauromaquia nevertheless involves a radical and fairly subversive critique. In these works Goya celebrates the power and nobility of the bull rather than the people portrayed, anticipating the sensibility of French Romantics like Géricault and Delacroix. Similarly, the amorphous space and flat patterning of his compositions are personal and unexpected, predicting elements in the style of critical early modernists, notably Manet. Faithful to the poet Moratin’s history of bulls and bullfighting in Spain, the first plates of the Tauromaquia illustrate the origins of the sport. Here, men on horseback and on foot bring down a wild bull.", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, University Purchase, 1962", "Copyright_Type" : "public domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "print", "Creation_Place2" : "Spanish", "Department" : "Prints and Drawings", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/P1962.9.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/P1962.9.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/P1962.9.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/P1962.9.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "4920", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 1772, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/1772", "Disp_Access_No" : "P1962.10", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1815-1816 (p. 1905)", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1815", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1816", "Disp_Title" : "Pepe Illo haciendo el recorte al toro [Pepe Illo making the pass of the 'recorte'], plate 29 from La Tauromaquia", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Pepe Illo haciendo el recorte al toro [Pepe Illo making the pass of the 'recorte'], plate 29 from La Tauromaquia", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Francisco de Goya y Lucientes", "Sort_Artist" : "Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de", "Disp_Dimen" : "25.1 cm x 35.85 cm (9 7/8 in. x 14 1/8 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "25.1 cm", "Disp_Width" : "35.85 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "Sheet", "Medium" : "Etching, burnished aquatint, drypoint and burin", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Etching, burnished aquatint, drypoint and burin", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In 1816, Goya announced the publication of “thirty-three prints that represent different maneuvers and positions in the art of contesting with bulls.” La Tauromaquia––The Bullfight––presents some of the great figures and moments of Spain’s national pastime. Goya’s choice of subject was guided by the poet Don Nicoás Fernandez de Moratín’s brief history of bullfighting, published in Madrid in 1777, and by a manual attributed to the most famous matador of the time, Pepe Illo, published in Cádiz in 1796. While the intention and the imagery of the series are the most conventional of Goya’s print series, the Tauromaquia nevertheless involves a radical and fairly subversive critique. In these works Goya celebrates the power and nobility of the bull rather than the people portrayed, anticipating the sensibility of French Romantics like Géricault and Delacroix. Similarly, the amorphous space and flat patterning of his compositions are personal and unexpected, predicting elements in the style of critical early modernists, notably Manet. Pepe Illo was the most famous matador in Seville and the author of a manual on bullfighting published in 1796. His manual recounts this scene, in which he guides the bull into a characteristic “curtsy,” and responds with a bow of respect. ", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, University Purchase, 1962", "Copyright_Type" : "public domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "print", "Creation_Place2" : "Spanish", "Department" : "Prints and Drawings", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/P1962.10.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/P1962.10.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/P1962.10.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/P1962.10.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "4919", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 1773, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/1773", "Disp_Access_No" : "P1962.12", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1815-1816 (p. 1905)", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1815", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1816", "Disp_Title" : "Cogida de un moro estando en la plaza [A Moor Caught by the Bull in the Ring], plate 8 from La Tauromaquia", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Cogida de un moro estando en la plaza [A Moor Caught by the Bull in the Ring], plate 8 from La Tauromaquia", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Francisco de Goya y Lucientes", "Sort_Artist" : "Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de", "Disp_Dimen" : "25.1 cm x 35.85 cm (9 7/8 in. x 14 1/8 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "25.1 cm", "Disp_Width" : "35.85 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "Sheet", "Medium" : "Etching, burnished aquatint and drypoint", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Etching, burnished aquatint and drypoint", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In 1816, Goya announced the publication of “thirty-three prints that represent different maneuvers and positions in the art of contesting with bulls.” La Tauromaquia––The Bullfight––presents some of the great figures and moments of Spain’s national pastime. Goya’s choice of subject was guided by the poet Don Nicoás Fernandez de Moratín’s brief history of bullfighting, published in Madrid in 1777, and by a manual attributed to the most famous matador of the time, Pepe Illo, published in Cádiz in 1796. While the intention and the imagery of the series are the most conventional of Goya’s print series, the Tauromaquia nevertheless involves a radical and fairly subversive critique. In these works Goya celebrates the power and nobility of the bull rather than the people portrayed, anticipating the sensibility of French Romantics like Géricault and Delacroix. Similarly, the amorphous space and flat patterning of his compositions are personal and unexpected, predicting elements in the style of critical early modernists, notably Manet. The physical power and indomitable spirit of the bull is a theme throughout the Tauromaquia. There are numerous scenes of matadors gored or killed in the ring, but not one with the mighty beast completely subdued or felled. Especially abbreviated in the description of surroundings and flat in the depiction of space, this plate may have been unfinished. ", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, University Purchase, 1962", "Copyright_Type" : "public domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "print", "Creation_Place2" : "Spanish", "Department" : "Prints and Drawings", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/P1962.12.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/P1962.12.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/P1962.12.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/P1962.12.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "4921", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 1774, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/1774", "Disp_Access_No" : "P1962.13", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1816 (p. 1905)", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1816", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1816", "Disp_Title" : "Dos grupos de picadores arrollados de seguida por un solo toro [Two Teams of Picadors Thrown One After the Other by a Single Bull], plate 32 from La Tauromaquia", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Dos grupos de picadores arrollados de seguida por un solo toro [Two Teams of Picadors Thrown One After the Other by a Single Bull], plate 32 from La Tauromaquia", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Francisco de Goya y Lucientes", "Sort_Artist" : "Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de", "Disp_Dimen" : "29.85 cm x 46.75 cm (11 3/4 in. x 18 3/8 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "29.85 cm", "Disp_Width" : "46.75 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "Sheet", "Medium" : "Etching, burnished aquatint, drypoint and burin", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Etching, burnished aquatint, drypoint and burin", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, University Purchase, 1962", "Copyright_Type" : "public domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "print", "Creation_Place2" : "Spanish", "Department" : "Prints and Drawings", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/P1962.13.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/P1962.13.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/P1962.13.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/P1962.13.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "6196", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 3730, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/3730", "Disp_Access_No" : "1993.130", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1797-1799 (p. 1799)", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1797", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1799", "Disp_Title" : "Donde vá mama? [Where is Mother Going?], plate 65 from Los Caprichos", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Donde vá mama? [Where is Mother Going?], plate 65 from Los Caprichos", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Francisco de Goya y Lucientes", "Sort_Artist" : "Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de", "Disp_Dimen" : "28.1 cm x 19.4 cm (11 1/16 in. x 7 5/8 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "28.1 cm", "Disp_Width" : "19.4 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "Sheet", "Medium" : "Etching, aquatint and drypoint", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Etching, aquatint and drypoint", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The earliest of Goya’s four major print series by more than decade, the Caprichos were created in 1797-98. Free inventions, thus “caprices,” their eighty plates comment upon the tension between society and the individual, between ideals and realities, between belief and reason. Injustice, hypocrisy, and superstition are Goya’s principal targets; caricature, satire, and sarcasm his favorite weapons. In addition to the printed titles, a manuscript in the Prado Museum purportedly written by Goya elucidates the meaning of individual prints. The imagery of the Caprichos is rich with references, from established iconography to folk literature, songs, and sayings. But the series is above all original in the modern sense: the product of an individual and unfettered imagination. The Caprichos are also the first great demonstration of the expressive possibilities of aquatint, which had previously been used for reproducing the appearance of drawings. First published in 1799 they along with the Tauromaquia were the only series released during the artist’s lifetime. Retaining the plates, the Royal Academy in Madrid issued eleven more editions between 1855 and 1937, making the Caprichos the most widely circulated and best known of Goya’s prints. Carried away and tormented by her own offspring, a portly witch suffers the same fate as human parents of spoiled and ungrateful children. The Prado manuscript underscores the ironies: “Mother has dropsy and they have sent her on an outing. God willing, she may recover.” This early impression reveals the subtle gradation in the modeling of the mother’s body and touches of drypoint at her elbow. ", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of Jonathan Bober in honor of Julia and Stephen Wilkinson, 1993", "Copyright_Type" : "public domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "print", "Creation_Place2" : "Spanish", "Department" : "Prints and Drawings", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/1993.130.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/1993.130.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/1993.130.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/1993.130.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "3835", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 3731, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/3731", "Disp_Access_No" : "G1966.2.210", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1797-1799 (p. 1890-1900)", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1797", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1799", "Disp_Title" : "Devota profesion [Devout Profession], plate 70 from Los Caprichos", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Devota profesion [Devout Profession], plate 70 from Los Caprichos", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Francisco de Goya y Lucientes", "Sort_Artist" : "Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de", "Disp_Dimen" : "34.3 cm x 24.3 cm (13 1/2 in. x 9 9/16 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "34.3 cm", "Disp_Width" : "24.3 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "Sheet", "Medium" : "Etching, aquatint and drypoint", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Etching, aquatint and drypoint", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The earliest of Goya’s four major print series by more than decade, the Caprichos were created in 1797-98. Free inventions, thus “caprices,” their eighty plates comment upon the tension between society and the individual, between ideals and realities, between belief and reason. Injustice, hypocrisy, and superstition are Goya’s principal targets; caricature, satire, and sarcasm his favorite weapons. In addition to the printed titles, a manuscript in the Prado Museum purportedly written by Goya elucidates the meaning of individual prints. The imagery of the Caprichos is rich with references, from established iconography to folk literature, songs, and sayings. But the series is above all original in the modern sense: the product of an individual and unfettered imagination. The Caprichos are also the first great demonstration of the expressive possibilities of aquatint, which had previously been used for reproducing the appearance of drawings. First published in 1799 they along with the Tauromaquia were the only series released during the artist’s lifetime. Retaining the plates, the Royal Academy in Madrid issued eleven more editions between 1855 and 1937, making the Caprichos the most widely circulated and best known of Goya’s prints. The Prado manuscript gives a detailed script of this scene of witchcraft: “Will you swear to obey and respect your masters and superiors, to sweep the garrets, to spin, to ring bells, to howl, to yell, to fly, to cook, to grease, to suck, to bake, to blow, to fry, everything and whatever time you are ordered to?” “I swear.” “Well then, my girl, you are now a witch. Congratulations.” ", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of the children of L.M. Tonkin, 1966", "Copyright_Type" : "public domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "print", "Creation_Place2" : "Spanish", "Department" : "Prints and Drawings", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/G1966.2.210.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/G1966.2.210.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/G1966.2.210.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/G1966.2.210.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "4922", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 3979, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/3979", "Disp_Access_No" : "G1966.2.286", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1797-1799 (p. 1890-1900)", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1797", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1799", "Disp_Title" : "Muchachos al avío [Lads Making Ready], plate 11 from Los Caprichos", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Muchachos al avío [Lads Making Ready], plate 11 from Los Caprichos", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Francisco de Goya y Lucientes", "Sort_Artist" : "Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de", "Disp_Dimen" : "34.15 cm x 24.1 cm (13 7/16 in. x 9 1/2 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "34.15 cm", "Disp_Width" : "24.1 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "Sheet", "Medium" : "Etching, burnished aquatint and burin", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Etching, burnished aquatint and burin", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The earliest of Goya’s four major print series by more than decade, the Caprichos were created in 1797-98. Free inventions, thus “caprices,” their eighty plates comment upon the tension betweensociety and the individual, between ideals and realities, between belief and reason. Injustice, hypocrisy, and superstition are Goya’s principal targets; caricature, satire, and sarcasm his favorite weapons. In addition to the printed titles, a manuscript in the Prado Museum purportedly written by Goya elucidates the meaning of individual prints. The imagery of the Caprichos is rich with references, from established iconography to folk literature, songs, and sayings. But the series is above all original in the modern sense: the product of an individual and unfettered imagination. The Caprichos are also the first great demonstration of the expressive possibilities of aquatint, which had previously been used for reproducing the appearance of drawings. First published in 1799 they along with the Tauromaquia were the only series released during the artist’s lifetime. Retaining the plates, the Royal Academy in Madrid issued eleven more editions between 1855 and 1937, making the Caprichos the most widely circulated and best known of Goya’s prints. A group of youths slouch in a stark landscape. The inscription “wild merchants” on a preparatory drawing in the Prado Museum suggests that they are smugglers. Goya’s commentary is simpler: “Their faces and their clothes make it clear what they are.” Unfortunately, the areas of aquatint have become worn in this impression, lightening the night sky and the shadows, diminishing the print’s sense of menace.", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of the children of L.M. Tonkin, 1966", "Copyright_Type" : "public domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "print", "Creation_Place2" : "Spanish", "Department" : "Prints and Drawings", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/G1966.2.286.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/G1966.2.286.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/G1966.2.286.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/G1966.2.286.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "4810", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 8659, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/8659", "Disp_Access_No" : "1996.235", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1797-1799 (p. 1855)", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1797", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1799", "Disp_Title" : "Quien lo creyera! [Who Would Have Thought It!], plate 62 from Los Caprichos", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Quien lo creyera! [Who Would Have Thought It!], plate 62 from Los Caprichos", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Francisco de Goya y Lucientes", "Sort_Artist" : "Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de", "Disp_Dimen" : "31.2 cm x 21.3 cm (12 5/16 in. x 8 3/8 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "31.2 cm", "Disp_Width" : "21.3 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "Sheet", "Medium" : "Etching, burnished aquatint and burin", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Etching, burnished aquatint and burin", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The earliest of Goya’s four major print series by more than decade, the Caprichos were created in 1797-98. Free inventions, thus “caprices,” their eighty plates comment upon the tension betweensociety and the individual, between ideals and realities, between belief and reason. Injustice, hypocrisy, and superstition are Goya’s principal targets; caricature, satire, and sarcasm his favorite weapons. In addition to the printed titles, a manuscript in the Prado Museum purportedly written by Goya elucidates the meaning of individual prints. The imagery of the Caprichos is rich with references, from established iconography to folk literature, songs, and sayings. But the series is above all original in the modern sense: the product of an individual and unfettered imagination. The Caprichos are also the first great demonstration of the expressive possibilities of aquatint, which had previously been used for reproducing the appearance of drawings. First published in 1799 they along with the Tauromaquia were the only series released during the artist’s lifetime. Retaining the plates, the Royal Academy in Madrid issued eleven more editions between 1855 and 1937, making the Caprichos the most widely circulated and best known of Goya’s prints. Belief in witches and witchcraft was the subject of ten successive plates in the Caprichos. This, the first of the group, shows two witches wrestling as they plummet down toward the outstretched claws of an enormous cat. Goya’s text draws larger lessons: “See here is a terrible quarrel as to which of the two is more of a witch. Who would have thought that the screechy one and the grizzly one would tear each other’s hair in this way? Friendship is the daughter of virtue. Villains may be accomplices but not friends.” ", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of Jonathan Bober, 1996", "Copyright_Type" : "public domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "print", "Creation_Place2" : "Spanish", "Department" : "Prints and Drawings", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/1996.235.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/1996.235.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/1996.235.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/1996.235.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "4904", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 8661, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/8661", "Disp_Access_No" : "U12", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1797-1798 (p. 1868)", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1797", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1798", "Disp_Title" : "Despacha, que dispiértan [Be Quick, They Are Waking Up], plate 78 from Los Caprichos", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Despacha, que dispiértan [Be Quick, They Are Waking Up], plate 78 from Los Caprichos", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Francisco de Goya y Lucientes", "Sort_Artist" : "Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de", "Disp_Dimen" : "31.15 cm x 22.5 cm (12 1/4 in. x 8 7/8 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "31.15 cm", "Disp_Width" : "22.5 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "Sheet", "Medium" : "Etching and burnished aquatint", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Etching and burnished aquatint", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Undetermined Source", "Copyright_Type" : "Public domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "print", "Creation_Place2" : "Spanish", "Department" : "Prints and Drawings", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/U12.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/U12.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/U12.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/U12.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "8319", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 8662, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/8662", "Disp_Access_No" : "1994.56", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1797-1798 (p. 1868)", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1797", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1798", "Disp_Title" : "Donde vá mama? [Where is Mother Going?], plate 65 from Los Caprichos", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Donde vá mama? [Where is Mother Going?], plate 65 from Los Caprichos", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Francisco de Goya y Lucientes", "Sort_Artist" : "Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de", "Disp_Dimen" : "31.6 cm x 21.7 cm (12 7/16 in. x 8 9/16 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "31.6 cm", "Disp_Width" : "21.7 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "Sheet", "Medium" : "Etching, aquatint and drypoint", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Etching, aquatint and drypoint", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Makoto Miyagi, 1994", "Copyright_Type" : "Public domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "print", "Creation_Place2" : "Spanish", "Department" : "Prints and Drawings", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/1994.56.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/1994.56.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/1994.56.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/1994.56.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "8308", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 8663, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/8663", "Disp_Access_No" : "1998.70", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1797-1799", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1797", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1799", "Disp_Title" : "De que mal morira? [Of What Ill Will He Die?], plate 40 from Los Caprichos", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "De que mal morira? [Of What Ill Will He Die?], plate 40 from Los Caprichos", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Francisco de Goya y Lucientes", "Sort_Artist" : "Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de", "Disp_Dimen" : "30.7 cm x 21.3 cm (12 1/16 in. x 8 3/8 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "30.7 cm", "Disp_Width" : "21.3 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "Sheet", "Medium" : "Etching and aquatint", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Etching and aquatint", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Goya used irony and satire to explain countless aspects of the human condition in his famous series Los Capricios. Based on Spanish folklore, the precise meaning of many of the images in this series continues to elude scholars. Nonetheless, it is clear that one of the sub-themes of the series concerns donkeys, in their bestial dumbness and proverbial stubbornness, in human roles. In this print, the doctor is the victim of Goya's satiric wit. A donkey, dressed in a contemporary doctor's outfit that includes gentlemen's shoes, sits at the bedside of a patient whose pulse he takes. The patient, whose hand is limp, looks gravely ill and in dire need of a doctor. The patient's loved ones, silhouetted in the background, anxiously await the report of four-legged, medical expert summoned to the sickbed. As the title underscores, it is not clear whether the patient will die from the illness or this doctor's treatment. ", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, The Karen G. and Dr. Elgin W. Ware, Jr. Collection, 1998", "Copyright_Type" : "public domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "print", "Creation_Place2" : "Spanish", "Department" : "Prints and Drawings", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/1998.70.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/1998.70.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/1998.70.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/1998.70.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "4905", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 8664, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/8664", "Disp_Access_No" : "1989.8", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1797-1799", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1797", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1799", "Disp_Title" : "Las rinde el sueño [Sleep Overcomes Them], plate 34 from Los Caprichos", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Las rinde el sueño [Sleep Overcomes Them], plate 34 from Los Caprichos", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Francisco de Goya y Lucientes", "Sort_Artist" : "Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de", "Disp_Dimen" : "31.7 cm x 21.2 cm (12 1/2 in. x 8 3/8 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "31.7 cm", "Disp_Width" : "21.2 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "Sheet", "Medium" : "Etching and burnished aquatint", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Etching and burnished aquatint", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Francisco de Goya’s etchings are a monument in the history of printmaking. It was in the more private world of these prints that the artist’s personality was given free rein, the comment upon his own time was most acerbic, and the indifference to artistic convention was most striking. Goya’s four major series—the fantastically ironic Caprichos, the fiercely candid Desastres de la Guerra, the formally and morally ambiguous Tauromaquia, and the surreal Disparates—are fundamental works of modern art. The Caprichos is the earliest and best-known series. Its eighty plates weave popular imagery, folklore, and the residue of Baroque allegory into fanciful images that mock society’s beliefs and habits. Their captions, also devised by the artist, are equally personal and usually sarcastic. With no appreciable tradition of printmaking in Spain, Goya drew inspiration from both British satire and Giambattista Tiepolo’s allegories. But the imagination and subversiveness of the Caprichos, their privileging of individual sensibility over any other artistic consideration, was his own genius. Showing four figures submerged in darkness, perhaps that of a prison, this plate is one of the few unleavened by humor and undirected toward specific comment. Redolent of the iconography of Christ on the Mount of Olives, but with no angel to comfort, the scene becomes thoroughly existential. ", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, The Teaching Collection of Marvin Vexler, '48, 1989", "Copyright_Type" : "public domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "print", "Creation_Place2" : "Spanish", "Department" : "Prints and Drawings", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/1989.8.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/1989.8.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/1989.8.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/1989.8.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "1495", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 8704, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/8704", "Disp_Access_No" : "1992.257", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1815-1816 (p. 1855)", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1815", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1816", "Disp_Title" : "El Cid Campeador lanceando otro toro [The Cid Campeador Spearing another Bull], plate 11 from La Tauromaquia", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "El Cid Campeador lanceando otro toro [The Cid Campeador Spearing another Bull], plate 11 from La Tauromaquia", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Francisco de Goya y Lucientes", "Sort_Artist" : "Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de", "Disp_Dimen" : "30.8 cm x 41.4 cm (12 1/8 in. x 16 5/16 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "30.8 cm", "Disp_Width" : "41.4 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "Sheet", "Medium" : "Etching, burnished aquatint and burin", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Etching, burnished aquatint and burin", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In 1816, Goya announced the publication of “thirty-three prints that represent different maneuvers and positions in the art of contesting with bulls.” La Tauromaquia––The Bullfight––presents some of the great figures and moments of Spain’s national pastime. Goya’s choice of subject was guided by the poet Don Nicoás Fernandez de Moratín’s brief history of bullfighting, published in Madrid in 1777, and by a manual attributed to the most famous matador of the time, Pepe Illo, published in Cádiz in 1796. While the intention and the imagery of the series are the most conventional of Goya’s print series, the Tauromaquia nevertheless involves a radical and fairly subversive critique. In these works Goya celebrates the power and nobility of the bull rather than the people portrayed, anticipating the sensibility of French Romantics like Géricault and Delacroix. Similarly, the amorphous space and flat patterning of his compositions are personal and unexpected, predicting elements in the style of critical early modernists, notably Manet. Moratín’s text includes the legendary soldier Rodrigo Diaz de Vivar. Diaz served the Moorish king of Zargoza in the eleventh century, becoming the archetypal Castillian warrior and the national hero known as El Cid Campeador. ", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, The 1992 Friends of the Archer M. Huntington Art Gallery Purchase", "Copyright_Type" : "public domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "print", "Creation_Place2" : "Spanish", "Department" : "Prints and Drawings", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/1992.257.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/1992.257.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/1992.257.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/1992.257.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "4914", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 10988, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/10988", "Disp_Access_No" : "2002.1422", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "circa 1814 (p. 1867)", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1809", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1819", "Disp_Title" : "Tan bárbara la seguridad como el delito [The Custody is as Barbarous as the Crime] (Little Prisoner)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Tan bárbara la seguridad como el delito [The Custody is as Barbarous as the Crime] (Little Prisoner)", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Francisco de Goya y Lucientes", "Sort_Artist" : "Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de", "Disp_Dimen" : "25 cm x 16.8 cm (9 13/16 in. x 6 5/8 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "25 cm", "Disp_Width" : "16.8 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Etching and burin", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Etching and burin", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Goya began working on his last series of etchings around 1815. When he departed for Bordeaux in 1824, he left twenty-two plates with his son Javier. Eighteen of the plates were published for the first time in Paris in 1864 under the title of Los Proverbios—The Proverbs. The other four plates, which had been separated around 1844, were re-discovered in 1877 and published in the French journal L’Art. Since the word “disparate,” translatable as folly, appears in the captions that Goya himself inscribed on a group of working proofs, the series is alternately called Los Disparates. Their imagery is the most complex and their meaning the most illusive of Goya’s series. The broad themes are still those of the Caprichos, but reason seems to have been completely overwhelmed and the prints are full of nightmarish visions. The Little Prisoner is one of three small etchings of single figures, faceless and perfectly hopeless in their confinement. Ostensibly separate from a larger series, they resemble the Desastres de la Guerra in spirit and technique. In at least one instance, working proofs of the Prisoners and the Desastres were bound together in an album, demonstrating that Goya himself saw them as related. ", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, The Leo Steinberg Collection, 2002", "Copyright_Type" : "public domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "print", "Creation_Place2" : "Spanish", "Department" : "Prints and Drawings", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2002.1422.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2002.1422.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2002.1422.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2002.1422.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "4906", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 11356, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/11356", "Disp_Access_No" : "1989.131", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1810 - circa 1820 (p. 1863)", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1810", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1820", "Disp_Title" : "Contra el bien general [Against the Common Good], plate 71 from Los Desastres de la Guerra", "Alt_Title" : " ", "Obj_Title" : "Contra el bien general [Against the Common Good], plate 71 from Los Desastres de la Guerra", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Francisco de Goya y Lucientes", "Sort_Artist" : "Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de", "Disp_Dimen" : "23.5 cm x 27.7 cm (9 1/4 in. x 10 7/8 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "23.5 cm", "Disp_Width" : "27.7 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "Sheet", "Medium" : "Etching and burnisher", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Etching and burnisher", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Goya began the drawings for this series of eighty prints, Los desastres de la guerra, in 1808, the year French forces invaded Spain and began their brutal six-year occupation of the country. The first plate was created in 1810 with the series completed and put in definitive order in 1820. Rather than the grand scale and heroic sweep of battle or the valor and bravery of the combatants, the Desastres present vignettes of deliberately awkward, fragmentary, and unstable composition and highlight the suffering of common people. This series is Goya’s most realistic; its close focus and unflinching record break with traditional artistic representations of war and presage documentary photography. Refusing to make any aspect of warfare attractive or to find any consolation for its effects, the Desastres anticipate the character of twentieth-century responses to war, from Expressionism to Existentialism. Because of the controversial nature of its content, Goya did not publish it during his lifetime. The first edition was issued in 1863, thirty-five years after Goya’s death. The last ten plates of the Desastres return to the fantastic imagery and satirical tone of the Caprichos. In this, the first of the group, a monk with monstrous wings writes in a great ledger. With his back turned to the pleading figures in the background, he raises an imperious finger to instruct their patience. Clerics played a prominent role in the hated bureaucracy of Ferdinand VII, king of Spain during the period. ", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of Jonathan Bober, 1989", "Copyright_Type" : "public domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "print", "Creation_Place2" : "Spanish", "Department" : "Prints and Drawings", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/1989.131.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/1989.131.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/1989.131.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/1989.131.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "4913", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 11357, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/11357", "Disp_Access_No" : "1994.31", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1810 - circa 1820 (p. 1903)", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1810", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1820", "Disp_Title" : "Ni por esas [Neither Do These], plate 11 from Los Desastres de la Guerra", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Ni por esas [Neither Do These], plate 11 from Los Desastres de la Guerra", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Francisco de Goya y Lucientes", "Sort_Artist" : "Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de", "Disp_Dimen" : "24.5 cm x 32.8 cm (9 5/8 in. x 12 15/16 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "24.5 cm", "Disp_Width" : "32.8 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "Sheet", "Medium" : "Etching, lavis, drypoint and burin", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Etching, lavis, drypoint and burin", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Goya began the drawings for this series of eighty prints, Los desastres de la guerra, in 1808, the year French forces invaded Spain and began their brutal six-year occupation of the country. The first plate was created in 1810 with the series completed and put in definitive order in 1820. Rather than the grand scale and heroic sweep of battle or the valor and bravery of the combatants, the Desastres present vignettes of deliberately awkward, fragmentary, and unstable composition and highlight the suffering of common people. This series is Goya’s most realistic; its close focus and unflinching record break with traditional artistic representations of war and presage documentary photography. Refusing to make any aspect of warfare attractive or to find any consolation for its effects, the Desastres anticipate the character of twentieth-century responses to war, from Expressionism to Existentialism. Because of the controversial nature of its content, Goya did not publish it during his lifetime. The first edition was issued in 1863, thirty-five years after Goya’s death. This plate is one of several in the series, that concern the suffering of Spanish women at the hands of the Napoleonic forces. The fine equilibrium of the group in the foreground, the elegant rhyme of the curve in the background, and the shadow of a church underscore the scene’s brutality", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Purchase through the generosity of Susan Thomas, 1994", "Copyright_Type" : "public domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "print", "Creation_Place2" : "Spanish", "Department" : "Prints and Drawings", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/1994.31.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/1994.31.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/1994.31.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/1994.31.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "4916", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 11358, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/11358", "Disp_Access_No" : "2002.1429", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1815-1816 (p. 1816)", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1815", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1816", "Disp_Title" : "Dos grupos de picadores arrollados de seguida por un solo toro [Two Teams of Picadors Thrown One After the Other by a Single Bull], plate 32 from La Tauromaquia", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Dos grupos de picadores arrollados de seguida por un solo toro [Two Teams of Picadors Thrown One After the Other by a Single Bull], plate 32 from La Tauromaquia", "Series_Title" : "La Tauromaquia", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Francisco de Goya y Lucientes", "Sort_Artist" : "Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de", "Disp_Dimen" : "24.9 cm x 36 cm (9 13/16 in. x 14 3/16 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "24.9 cm", "Disp_Width" : "36 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "Sheet", "Medium" : "Etching, burnished aquatint, drypoint and burin", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Etching, burnished aquatint, drypoint and burin", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In 1816, Goya announced the publication of “thirty-three prints that represent different maneuvers and positions in the art of contesting with bulls.” La Tauromaquia––The Bullfight––presents some of the great figures and moments of Spain’s national pastime. Goya’s choice of subject was guided by the poet Don Nicoás Fernandez de Moratín’s brief history of bullfighting, published in Madrid in 1777, and by a manual attributed to the most famous matador of the time, Pepe Illo, published in Cádiz in 1796. While the intention and the imagery of the series are the most conventional of Goya’s print series, the Tauromaquia nevertheless involves a radical and fairly subversive critique. In these works Goya celebrates the power and nobility of the bull rather than the people portrayed, anticipating the sensibility of French Romantics like Géricault and Delacroix. Similarly, the amorphous space and flat patterning of his compositions are personal and unexpected, predicting elements in the style of critical early modernists, notably Manet. A bull has killed one horse and upends another as picadors struggle to subdue him. This scene is the most panoramic and dynamic of the Tauromaquia. It is also the closest in spirit to the work of French Romantic artists like Géricault and Delacroix, and their celebration of the power of nature. ", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, The Leo Steinberg Collection, 2002", "Copyright_Type" : "public domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "print", "Creation_Place2" : "Spanish", "Department" : "Prints and Drawings", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2002.1429.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2002.1429.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2002.1429.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2002.1429.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "1786", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 11360, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/11360", "Disp_Access_No" : "1994.16", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "circa 1816-1824 (p. 1864)", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1816", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1824", "Disp_Title" : "Disparate general [General Folly], plate 9 from Los Proverbios", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Disparate general [General Folly], plate 9 from Los Proverbios", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Francisco de Goya y Lucientes", "Sort_Artist" : "Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de", "Disp_Dimen" : "33.7 cm x 50.2 cm (13 1/4 in. x 19 3/4 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "33.7 cm", "Disp_Width" : "50.2 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "Sheet", "Medium" : "Etching and burnished aquatint", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Etching and burnished aquatint", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Goya began working on his last series of etchings around 1815. When he departed for Bordeaux in 1824, he left twenty-two plates with his son Javier. Eighteen of the plates were published for the first time in Paris in 1864 under the title of Los Proverbios—The Proverbs. The other four plates, which had been separated around 1844, were re-discovered in 1877 and published in the French journal L’Art. Since the word “disparate,” translatable as folly, appears in the captions that Goya himself inscribed on a group of working proofs, the series is alternately called Los Disparates. Their imagery is the most complex and their meaning the most illusive of Goya’s series. The broad themes are still those of the Caprichos, but reason seems to have been completely overwhelmed and the prints are full of nightmarish visions. This subject is one of the most obscure and difficult to interpret in the Proverbios. In the foreground a cleric kneels to receive a litter of kittens. On his right, an elderly man with a long beard is absorbed in reading. In the tangle behind, a female figure flies toward a suspended baby. In the left background, a dwarfish figure strides forward. If, as has been suggested, this figure refers to Napoleon, then the larger group could be a microcosm of Spain, caught up in tradition and confused by superstition", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, The Teaching Collection of Marvin Vexler, '48, 1994", "Copyright_Type" : "public domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "print", "Creation_Place2" : "Spanish", "Department" : "Prints and Drawings", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/1994.16.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/1994.16.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/1994.16.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/1994.16.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "4915", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 11368, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/11368", "Disp_Access_No" : "1992.239", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "circa 1824-1826 (p. 1859)", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1824", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1826", "Disp_Title" : "El Embozado [The Cloaked Man] or El Torero anciano [The Old Bullfighter]", "Alt_Title" : "El Embozado", "Obj_Title" : "El Embozado [The Cloaked Man] or El Torero anciano [The Old Bullfighter]", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Francisco de Goya y Lucientes", "Sort_Artist" : "Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de", "Disp_Dimen" : "25.2 cm x 18.9 cm (9 15/16 in. x 7 7/16 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "25.2 cm", "Disp_Width" : "18.9 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "Sheet", "Medium" : "Etching with posthumous drypoint additions ", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Etching with posthumous drypoint additions ", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Goya began working on his last series of etchings around 1815. When he departed for Bordeaux in 1824, he left twenty-two plates with his son Javier. Eighteen of the plates were published for the first time in Paris in 1864 under the title of Los Proverbios—The Proverbs. The other four plates, which had been separated around 1844, were re-discovered in 1877 and published in the French journal L’Art. Since the word “disparate,” translatable as folly, appears in the captions that Goya himself inscribed on a group of working proofs, the series is alternately called Los Disparates. Their imagery is the most complex and their meaning the most illusive of Goya’s series. The broad themes are still those of the Caprichos, but reason seems to have been completely overwhelmed and the prints are full of nightmarish visions. This is one of seven etchings created by Goya during his last four years in exile in Bordeaux. The plates recall the format and types of the Caprichos, but with the vague settings and mysterious meanings of the Proverbios. (The bull in the background appears added by a later hand.) It may be that Goya conceived them as part of a new series of caprichos, which he then abandoned in favor of lithography. There exist just one contemporary proof and a handful of impressions from posthumous printings. ", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Archer M. Huntington Museum Fund, 1992", "Copyright_Type" : "public domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "print", "Creation_Place2" : "Spanish", "Department" : "Prints and Drawings", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/1992.239.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/1992.239.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/1992.239.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/1992.239.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "4801", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 12901, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/12901", "Disp_Access_No" : "2002.1423", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1797-1799 (p. 1890-1900)", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1797", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1799", "Disp_Title" : "Nadie se conoce [Nobody Knows Himself], plate 6 from Los Caprichos", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Nadie se conoce [Nobody Knows Himself], plate 6 from Los Caprichos", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Francisco de Goya y Lucientes", "Sort_Artist" : "Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de", "Disp_Dimen" : "34.1 cm x 24.5 cm (13 7/16 in. x 9 5/8 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "34.1 cm", "Disp_Width" : "24.5 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Etching and burnished aquatint", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Etching and burnished aquatint", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The earliest of Goya’s four major print series by more than decade, the Caprichos were created in 1797-98. Free inventions, thus “caprices,” their eighty plates comment upon the tension betweensociety and the individual, between ideals and realities, between belief and reason. Injustice, hypocrisy, and superstition are Goya’s principal targets; caricature, satire, and sarcasm his favorite weapons. In addition to the printed titles, a manuscript in the Prado Museum purportedly written by Goya elucidates the meaning of individual prints. The imagery of the Caprichos is rich with references, from established iconography to folk literature, songs, and sayings. But the series is above all original in the modern sense: the product of an individual and unfettered imagination. The Caprichos are also the first great demonstration of the expressive possibilities of aquatint, which had previously been used for reproducing the appearance of drawings. First published in 1799 they along with the Tauromaquia were the only series released during the artist’s lifetime. Retaining the plates, the Royal Academy in Madrid issued eleven more editions between 1855 and 1937, making the Caprichos the most widely circulated and best known of Goya’s prints. Revelers in costume celebrate Carnival. Whether hidden by mask, obscured by shadow, or averted, no face is clearly visible. Goya writes, “The world is a masquerade. Face, dress and voice, all are false. All wish to appear what they are not, all deceive and do not even know themselves.” ", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, The Leo Steinberg Collection, 2002", "Copyright_Type" : "public domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "print", "Creation_Place2" : "Spanish", "Department" : "Prints and Drawings", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2002.1423.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2002.1423.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2002.1423.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2002.1423.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "4907", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 12902, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/12902", "Disp_Access_No" : "2002.1424", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1797-1799 (p. 1890-1900)", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1797", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1799", "Disp_Title" : "Dios la perdone: y era su madre [For Heaven's Sake: And It Was Her Mother], plate 16 from Los Caprichos", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Dios la perdone: y era su madre [For Heaven's Sake: And It Was Her Mother], plate 16 from Los Caprichos", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Francisco de Goya y Lucientes", "Sort_Artist" : "Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de", "Disp_Dimen" : "34.1 cm x 24.4 cm (13 7/16 in. x 9 5/8 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "34.1 cm", "Disp_Width" : "24.4 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Etching, aquatint and drypoint", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Etching, aquatint and drypoint", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The earliest of Goya’s four major print series by more than decade, the Caprichos were created in 1797-98. Free inventions, thus “caprices,” their eighty plates comment upon the tension betweensociety and the individual, between ideals and realities, between belief and reason. Injustice, hypocrisy, and superstition are Goya’s principal targets; caricature, satire, and sarcasm his favorite weapons. In addition to the printed titles, a manuscript in the Prado Museum purportedly written by Goya elucidates the meaning of individual prints. The imagery of the Caprichos is rich with references, from established iconography to folk literature, songs, and sayings. But the series is above all original in the modern sense: the product of an individual and unfettered imagination. The Caprichos are also the first great demonstration of the expressive possibilities of aquatint, which had previously been used for reproducing the appearance of drawings. First published in 1799 they along with the Tauromaquia were the only series released during the artist’s lifetime. Retaining the plates, the Royal Academy in Madrid issued eleven more editions between 1855 and 1937, making the Caprichos the most widely circulated and best known of Goya’s prints. The Prado manuscript explains, “The young woman left her home as a little girl. She did her apprenticeship at Cadiz, she came to Madrid: there she ‘won the lottery’. She goes down to the Prado, and hears a grimy, decrepit old woman begging her for alms; she sends her away, the old woman persists. The fashionable young woman turns round and finds––who would have thought it––that the poor old woman is her mother.” ", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, The Leo Steinberg Collection, 2002", "Copyright_Type" : "public domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "print", "Creation_Place2" : "Spanish", "Department" : "Prints and Drawings", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2002.1424.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2002.1424.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2002.1424.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2002.1424.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "4908", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 12903, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/12903", "Disp_Access_No" : "2002.1425", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1797-1799 (p. 1799)", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1797", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1799", "Disp_Title" : "Tragala Perro [Swallow It, Dog], plate 58 from Los Caprichos", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Tragala Perro [Swallow It, Dog], plate 58 from Los Caprichos", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Francisco de Goya y Lucientes", "Sort_Artist" : "Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de", "Disp_Dimen" : "31.8 cm x 23 cm (12 1/2 in. x 9 1/16 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "31.8 cm", "Disp_Width" : "23 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Etching, burnished aquatint and drypoint", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Etching, burnished aquatint and drypoint", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The earliest of Goya’s four major print series by more than decade, the Caprichos were created in 1797-98. Free inventions, thus “caprices,” their eighty plates comment upon the tension betweensociety and the individual, between ideals and realities, between belief and reason. Injustice, hypocrisy, and superstition are Goya’s principal targets; caricature, satire, and sarcasm his favorite weapons. In addition to the printed titles, a manuscript in the Prado Museum purportedly written by Goya elucidates the meaning of individual prints. The imagery of the Caprichos is rich with references, from established iconography to folk literature, songs, and sayings. But the series is above all original in the modern sense: the product of an individual and unfettered imagination. The Caprichos are also the first great demonstration of the expressive possibilities of aquatint, which had previously been used for reproducing the appearance of drawings. First published in 1799 they along with the Tauromaquia were the only series released during the artist’s lifetime. Retaining the plates, the Royal Academy in Madrid issued eleven more editions between 1855 and 1937, making the Caprichos the most widely circulated and best known of Goya’s prints. In a fiercely anti-religious image, grotesque monks set upon a pleading man. One holds an enormous syringe with which to purge him of supposed evils. Goya’s commentary elaborates upon the reversal of their roles: “He who lives amongst men will be irremediably vexed [“screwed” is an appropriately colloquial translation of the Spanish, “jeringar”]. If he wants to avoid it he will have to go live in the mountains, but when he is there he will discover that to live alone is vexatious.” ", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, The Leo Steinberg Collection, 2002", "Copyright_Type" : "public domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "print", "Creation_Place2" : "Spanish", "Department" : "Prints and Drawings", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2002.1425.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2002.1425.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2002.1425.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2002.1425.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "4909", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 12904, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/12904", "Disp_Access_No" : "2002.1426", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1797-1798", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1797", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1798", "Disp_Title" : "Donde vá mama? [Where is Mother Going?], plate 65 from Los Caprichos", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Donde vá mama? [Where is Mother Going?], plate 65 from Los Caprichos", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Francisco de Goya y Lucientes", "Sort_Artist" : "Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de", "Disp_Dimen" : "", "Disp_Height" : "", "Disp_Width" : "", "Dimen_Extent" : "", "Medium" : "Etching", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Etching", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, The Leo Steinberg Collection, 2002", "Copyright_Type" : "Public domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "print", "Creation_Place2" : "Spanish", "Department" : "Prints and Drawings", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ ] },{ "embark_ID" : 12905, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/12905", "Disp_Access_No" : "2002.1427", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1797-1799 (p. 1799)", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1797", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1799", "Disp_Title" : "Linda maestra! [Pretty Teacher!], plate 68 from Los Caprichos", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Linda maestra! [Pretty Teacher!], plate 68 from Los Caprichos", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Francisco de Goya y Lucientes", "Sort_Artist" : "Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de", "Disp_Dimen" : "25.6 cm x 18.5 cm (10 1/16 in. x 7 5/16 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "25.6 cm", "Disp_Width" : "18.5 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Etching, burnished aquatint and drypoint", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Etching, burnished aquatint and drypoint", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The earliest of Goya’s four major print series by more than decade, the Caprichos were created in 1797-98. Free inventions, thus “caprices,” their eighty plates comment upon the tension between society and the individual, between ideals and realities, between belief and reason. Injustice, hypocrisy, and superstition are Goya’s principal targets; caricature, satire, and sarcasm his favorite weapons. In addition to the printed titles, a manuscript in the Prado Museum purportedly written by Goya elucidates the meaning of individual prints. The imagery of the Caprichos is rich with references, from established iconography to folk literature, songs, and sayings. But the series is above all original in the modern sense: the product of an individual and unfettered imagination. The Caprichos are also the first great demonstration of the expressive possibilities of aquatint, which had previously been used for reproducing the appearance of drawings. First published in 1799 they along with the Tauromaquia were the only series released during the artist’s lifetime. Retaining the plates, the Royal Academy in Madrid issued eleven more editions between 1855 and 1937, making the Caprichos the most widely circulated and best known of Goya’s prints. A decrepit witch teaches a nubile one the art of flight and, implicitly, the sexuality associated with their kind. Observed and drawn with sensitivity, this plate is one of the most conventionally beautiful and sympathetic in the Caprichos. Goya comments, “The broom is one of the most necessary implements for witches; for besides being great sweepers, as the stories tell, they may be able to change the broom into a fast mule and go with it where the Devil cannot reach them.” ", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, The Leo Steinberg Collection, 2002", "Copyright_Type" : "public domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "print", "Creation_Place2" : "Spanish", "Department" : "Prints and Drawings", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2002.1427.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2002.1427.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2002.1427.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2002.1427.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "4917", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 12906, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/12906", "Disp_Access_No" : "2002.1428", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1797-1799 (p. 1799)", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1797", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1799", "Disp_Title" : "Despacha, que dispiértan [Be Quick, They Are Waking Up], plate 78 from Los Caprichos", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Despacha, que dispiértan [Be Quick, They Are Waking Up], plate 78 from Los Caprichos", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Francisco de Goya y Lucientes", "Sort_Artist" : "Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de", "Disp_Dimen" : "30.5 cm x 20.4 cm (12 in. x 8 1/16 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "30.5 cm", "Disp_Width" : "20.4 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Etching and burnished aquatint", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Etching and burnished aquatint", "Info_Page_Comm" : " The earliest of Goya’s four major print series by more than decade, the Caprichos were created in 1797-98. Free inventions, thus “caprices,” their eighty plates comment upon the tension betweensociety and the individual, between ideals and realities, between belief and reason. Injustice, hypocrisy, and superstition are Goya’s principal targets; caricature, satire, and sarcasm his favorite weapons. In addition to the printed titles, a manuscript in the Prado Museum purportedly written by Goya elucidates the meaning of individual prints. The imagery of the Caprichos is rich with references, from established iconography to folk literature, songs, and sayings. But the series is above all original in the modern sense: the product of an individual and unfettered imagination. The Caprichos are also the first great demonstration of the expressive possibilities of aquatint, which had previously been used for reproducing the appearance of drawings. First published in 1799 they along with the Tauromaquia were the only series released during the artist’s lifetime. Retaining the plates, the Royal Academy in Madrid issued eleven more editions between 1855 and 1937, making the Caprichos the most widely circulated and best known of Goya’s prints. Three rather earnest and unthreatening goblins work through the night to complete their tasks in a kitchen. Ridiculing belief in the supernatural, Goya explains, “The goblins are the most industrious and obliging people there are. As the maid keeps them happy, they scour the pot, cook the vegetables, wash up, sweep and hush the child. It has often been disputed whether they are devils or not; don’t let us deceive ourselves. Devils are those who spend their time doing harm, or hindering others from doing good, or doing nothing at all.” ", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, The Leo Steinberg Collection, 2002", "Copyright_Type" : "public domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "print", "Creation_Place2" : "Spanish", "Department" : "Prints and Drawings", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2002.1428.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2002.1428.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2002.1428.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2002.1428.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "4918", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 18852, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/18852", "Disp_Access_No" : "2007.38", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "circa 1816-1824 (p. 1828-1877)", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1816", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1824", "Disp_Title" : "Disparate conocido [Well-Known Folly], from Los Proverbios", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Disparate conocido [Well-Known Folly], from Los Proverbios", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Francisco de Goya y Lucientes", "Sort_Artist" : "Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de", "Disp_Dimen" : "27.7 cm x 37.5 cm (10 7/8 in. x 14 3/4 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "27.7 cm", "Disp_Width" : "37.5 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Etching and burnished aquatint", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Etching and burnished aquatint", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Goya began working on his last series of etchings around 1815. When he departed for Bordeaux in 1824, he left twenty-two plates with his son Javier. Eighteen of the plates were published for the first time in Paris in 1864 under the title of Los Proverbios—The Proverbs. The other four plates, which had been separated around 1844, were re-discovered in 1877 and published in the French journal L’Art. Since the word “disparate,” translatable as folly, appears in the captions that Goya himself inscribed on a group of working proofs, the series is alternately called Los Disparates. Their imagery is the most complex and their meaning the most illusive of Goya’s series. The broad themes are still those of the Caprichos, but reason seems to have been completely overwhelmed and the prints are full of nightmarish visions. Threatened by a shrouded figure possibly holding a rifle and a shadowed one brandishing a sword, a group huddles while one offers a gleeful gesture of defiance. The great Goya scholar Tomás Harris associated this scene with the Spanish adage, “Dos a uno, meten la paja en el culo” [“If two to one, stuff your arse with straw”]. This is one of the four plates from the Proverbios that were re-discovered in 1877. A brilliant impression printed on thin Japanese paper, this proof precedes the first edition of these four additional plates. ", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Jack S. Blanton Curatorial Endowment Fund, 2007", "Copyright_Type" : "Public domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "print", "Creation_Place2" : "Spanish", "Department" : "Prints and Drawings", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2007.38.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2007.38.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2007.38.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2007.38.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "4470", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 20937, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/20937", "Disp_Access_No" : "2017.9", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1797-1799", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1797", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1799", "Disp_Title" : "Subir y bajar [To Rise and Fall], plate 56 from Los Caprichos", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Subir y bajar [To Rise and Fall], plate 56 from Los Caprichos", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Francisco de Goya y Lucientes", "Sort_Artist" : "Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de", "Disp_Dimen" : "30.6 x 19.6 cm (12 1/16 x 7 11/16 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "30.6 cm", "Disp_Width" : "19.6 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Etching and burnished aquatint", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Etching and burnished aquatint", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of Lee Chesney III, 2017", "Copyright_Type" : "public domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "print", "Creation_Place2" : "Spanish", "Department" : "Prints and Drawings", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ ] }, ] }