{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 2165, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/2165", "Disp_Access_No" : "1993.97", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1553", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1553", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1553", "Disp_Title" : "Landscape with a Pollard Willow", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Landscape with a Pollard Willow", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Hanns Lautensack", "Sort_Artist" : "Lautensack, Hanns", "Disp_Dimen" : "17.4 cm x 11.2 cm (6 7/8 in. x 4 7/16 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "17.4 cm", "Disp_Width" : "11.2 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "Sheet", "Medium" : "Etching", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Etching", "Info_Page_Comm" : "From around 1520 a distinctive style developed in the Danube Valley. Its artists, led by Albrecht Altdorfer, cultivated a self-consciously native style opposite to the classical, Italianate style popular in Nuremberg and Augsburg. Its compositions organic, its forms fluid, and its light supernatural, the style lent itself to expressionism in figural subjects and animism in the rendering of nature. The Danube School is the first in history to explore the metaphoric personality of pure landscape. Altdorfer, followed by Augustin Hirschvogel, was also the first to realize the aptness of etching for conveying the appearance and suggesting the character of nature. A Nuremberg printmaker, Hanns Lautensack brought a distinctively German landscape etching into a third generation. His principal work in the genre is a loose series of twenty plates executed in 1553 and 1554. Having generally deep perspectives with elaborately layered space, these plates impose a more regular structure and professional hand on the dramatic topography and dense growth associated with the Valley. In this plate the principal motifs—the gnarled outcrop, the leafing pollard, the spindly pines, and the dwarfed habitation—are especially clear and knowing citations of the Danube School. With its rich tone and soft luminosity, this very early impression retains something of the mystery and subjectivity of Altdorfer and Hirschvogel. ", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Purchase with funds provided by M.K. Hage, Jr., the Dean's Associates of the College of Fine Arts, and the Archer M. Huntington Museum Fund, 1993", "Copyright_Type" : "Public domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "print", "Creation_Place2" : "German", "Department" : "Prints and Drawings", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/1993.97.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/1993.97.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/1993.97.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/1993.97.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "3356", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }