{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 16844, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/16844", "Disp_Access_No" : "2003.81", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 2000", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1995", "_Disp_End_Date" : "2005", "Disp_Title" : "Café internet [Internet Café]", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Café internet [Internet Café]", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Abel Barroso", "Sort_Artist" : "Barroso, Abel", "Disp_Dimen" : "56.8 cm x 76.2 cm (22 3/8 in. x 30 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "56.8 cm", "Disp_Width" : "76.2 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Lithograph", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Lithograph", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of Fran Magee and Gallery 106, 2003", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "print", "Creation_Place2" : "Cuban", "Department" : "Prints and Drawings; Latin American Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2003.81.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2003.81.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2003.81.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2003.81.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "2144", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 16845, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/16845", "Disp_Access_No" : "2003.82", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "2000", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "2000", "_Disp_End_Date" : "2000", "Disp_Title" : "Internet de madera [Wooden Internet]", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Internet de madera [Wooden Internet]", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Abel Barroso", "Sort_Artist" : "Barroso, Abel", "Disp_Dimen" : "55.1 cm x 56.5 cm x 38.6 cm (21 11/16 in. x 22 1/4 in. x 15 3/16 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "55.1 cm", "Disp_Width" : "56.5 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "HWD", "Medium" : "Wood, ink, paper ", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Wood, ink, paper ", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Abel Barroso’s work uses humor and a low-tech interpretation of modern communications to comment on contemporary Cuban society and politics. Barroso, who trained as a printmaker, constructs his sculptures from used wood printing blocks that are themselves made from everyday materials such as plywood packing cases. In Internet de madera, the artist has created a “third world Internet” from carved plywood: a printed scroll serves as a “screen” that the viewer/user can move by manually turning the levers on the side. The consumerist use of the Internet is emphasized, though the series of photographs displayed on the “screen” were taken in the street markets in Cuba, thus conflating the fantasy of e-commerce with the reality of everyday transactions. This hybrid Internet machine/cash register is full of comical references to the high-tech global world to which Cubans have little access. For example, a credit card (American credit cards are illegal in Cuba) made of wood and carved with the word fantasía (“fantasy”) and a wooden 3 1/2–inch floppy disk both lie on the keyboard. This eternally unplugged and unconnected Internet machine is a powerful metaphor for Cuba’s place in the world and also a critique of the consumerist fantasies of developed societies", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of Fran Magee and Gallery 106, 2003", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "sculpture", "Creation_Place2" : "Cuban", "Department" : "Latin American Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2003.82.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2003.82.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2003.82.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2003.82.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "2145", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 16846, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/16846", "Disp_Access_No" : "2003.83", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "ca. 1986", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1981", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1991", "Disp_Title" : "Untitled, from El síndrome de Marco Polo [The Marco Polo Syndrome]", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Untitled, from El síndrome de Marco Polo [The Marco Polo Syndrome]", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Flavio Garciandía", "Sort_Artist" : "Garciandía, Flavio", "Disp_Dimen" : "99.1 cm x 129.5 cm (39 in. x 51 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "99.1 cm", "Disp_Width" : "129.5 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "canvas", "Medium" : "Acrylic and glitter ", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Acrylic and glitter on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Flavio Garciandía has been a leading figure in contemporary Cuban art since the 1970s. In “The Marco Polo Syndrome" series, Garciandía transforms the well-known comic-book character Cap. Elpidio Valdés, who fought against colonialism in Cuba, into a contemporary Marco Polo. Like the famed thirteenth-century Italian traveler, this Valdés goes to China, where he adopts the local language and dress. In this painting, Garciandía combines motifs appropriated from kitsch and popular culture to highlight how we tend to think about cultures different than our own in stereotypical terms. When Valdés returns home to the island, he is perceived through a filter of cultural clichés and he is no longer understood by his people. ", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of Fran Magee and Gallery 106, 2003", "Copyright_Type" : "all approved.", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "painting", "Creation_Place2" : "Cuban", "Department" : "Latin American Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2003.83.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2003.83.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2003.83.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2003.83.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "2146", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 18027, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/18027", "Disp_Access_No" : "2006.4", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "2001", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "2001", "_Disp_End_Date" : "2001", "Disp_Title" : "Untitled", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Untitled", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Kcho", "Sort_Artist" : "Kcho", "Disp_Dimen" : "113 cm x 82.5 cm (44 1/2 in. x 32 1/2 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "113 cm", "Disp_Width" : "82.5 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Lithograph", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Lithograph", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Best known for his large-scale installations and sculptures, Kcho uses commonplace objects such as oars, boats, and debris from his native Cuba in his works.  These materials allude to the massive migration of Cubans from that country following Fidel Castro’s rise to power. This work presents the viewer with the difficulties of Cuban emigration. The ambiguous figures in the boat are reaching for the oar that will get them to their destination. The out-of-reach oar illustrates the struggle of Cuban emigrants trying to escape their country under Castro’s rule.", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of Fran Magee and Gallery 106, 2006", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "print", "Creation_Place2" : "Cuban", "Department" : "Prints and Drawings; Latin American Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2006.4.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2006.4.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2006.4.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2006.4.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "3733", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 19596, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/19596", "Disp_Access_No" : "2010.91", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1999", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1999", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1999", "Disp_Title" : "Untitled, from La Serie Haber [Credit Series]", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Untitled, from La Serie Haber [Credit Series]", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Eduardo Ponjuán", "Sort_Artist" : "Ponjuán, Eduardo", "Disp_Dimen" : "34.7 cm x 22.4 cm (13 11/16 in. x 8 13/16 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "34.7 cm", "Disp_Width" : "22.4 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Inkjet transfer and conte crayon", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Inkjet transfer and conte crayon", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of Fran Magee, 2010", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "drawing", "Creation_Place2" : "Cuban", "Department" : "Prints and Drawings; Latin American Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2010.91.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2010.91.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2010.91.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2010.91.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "7841", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 19595, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/19595", "Disp_Access_No" : "2010.89", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1997", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1997", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1997", "Disp_Title" : "Untitled, from Serie por diversos conceptos [Miscellaneous Series]", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Untitled, from Serie por diversos conceptos [Miscellaneous Series]", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Eduardo Ponjuán", "Sort_Artist" : "Ponjuán, Eduardo", "Disp_Dimen" : "33.1 cm x 27.7 cm (13 1/16 in. x 10 7/8 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "33.1 cm", "Disp_Width" : "27.7 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Pen and ink with water", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Pen and ink with water", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Eduardo Ponjuan is considered among the leading contemporary artists working in Cuba. Ponjuan is interested in recycled materials as a medium for the creation of art. In the works included in Por diversos conceptos, a series of objects are printed on vintage accounting paper intervened by the artist. His drawings have been described as emerging from the lined paper as if an affirmation of the ability for art to overcome restrictions and limitations. In this work Ponjuan illustrates familiar objects in a manner of personifying and bringing life to them.", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of Fran Magee, 2010", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "drawing", "Creation_Place2" : "Cuban", "Department" : "Prints and Drawings; Latin American Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2010.89.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2010.89.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2010.89.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2010.89.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "7839", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 19593, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/19593", "Disp_Access_No" : "2010.88", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1997", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1997", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1997", "Disp_Title" : "El Palo de la guayaba [Guava Stick], from Serie por diversos conceptos [Miscellaneous]", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "El Palo de la guayaba [Guava Stick], from Serie por diversos conceptos [Miscellaneous]", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Eduardo Ponjuán", "Sort_Artist" : "Ponjuán, Eduardo", "Disp_Dimen" : "33.1 cm x 27.7 cm (13 1/16 in. x 10 7/8 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "33.1 cm", "Disp_Width" : "27.7 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Pen and ink with water and inkjet transfer", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Pen and ink with water and inkjet transfer", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Eduardo Ponjuan is considered among the leading contemporary artists working in Cuba. Ponjuan is interested in recycled materials as a medium for the creation of art. In the works included in Por diversos conceptos, a series of objects are printed on vintage accounting paper intervened by the artist. His drawings have been described as emerging from the lined paper as if an affirmation of the ability for art to overcome restrictions and limitations. In this work Ponjuan illustrates familiar objects in a manner of personifying and bringing life to them.", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of Fran Magee, 2010", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "drawing", "Creation_Place2" : "Cuban", "Department" : "Prints and Drawings; Latin American Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2010.88.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2010.88.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2010.88.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2010.88.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "7838", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 17176, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/17176", "Disp_Access_No" : "2004.128", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "Peina que te peina [Comb that You Comb]", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Peina que te peina [Comb that You Comb]", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "José Bedia", "Sort_Artist" : "Bedia, José", "Disp_Dimen" : "73.3 cm x 102.2 cm (28 7/8 in. x 40 1/4 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "73.3 cm", "Disp_Width" : "102.2 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Gouache on paper", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Gouache on paper", "Info_Page_Comm" : "José Bedia adds autobiographical context into the majority of his works. He combines anthropology, theology, history, culture, and personal experience in his art. His adopted religion, Palo Monte (an Afro-Latin religion), has been a significant influence on his work. Bedia creates physical pieces that represent the intangible rituals of his religion. Male figure representing the “common man” is an often-repeated image in several of Bedia’s works. His combination of Afro-Latin traditions, popular culture, anthropology, and religion presents the viewer with powerful art that serves as the artist’s biography as well as physical representation of ritualistic experiences.", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Fran Magee Fund and partial gift from Salah D. Hassan, 2004", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "drawing", "Creation_Place2" : "Cuban", "Department" : "Prints and Drawings; Latin American Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2004.128.TIF", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2004.128.TIF", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2004.128.TIF", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2004.128.TIF", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "10231", "Image_Type" : "Digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 19185, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/19185", "Disp_Access_No" : "2008.111", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "2000", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "2000", "_Disp_End_Date" : "2000", "Disp_Title" : "Untitled, from Serie Piedras [Rock Series]", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Untitled, from Serie Piedras [Rock Series]", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Kcho", "Sort_Artist" : "Kcho", "Disp_Dimen" : "50.1 cm x 65.3 cm (19 3/4 in. x 25 11/16 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "50.1 cm", "Disp_Width" : "65.3 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Ink on paper", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Ink on paper", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Best known for his large-scale installations and sculptures, Kcho uses commonplace objects such as oars, boats, and debris from his native Cuba in his works. These humble materials allude to the massive migration of Cubans from that country following Fidel Castro’s rise to power. Kcho’s Serie piedras [Rock Series] translates this sculptural vocabulary onto paper. While avoiding a direct statement about Cuban emigration, the oversized rock crushing and shattering a wood table and oar clearly references the dangers faced by Cubans who attempt to flee the country by sea.", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of Fran Magee, 2008", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "drawing", "Creation_Place2" : "Cuban", "Department" : "Prints and Drawings; Latin American Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2008.111.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2008.111.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2008.111.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2008.111.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "13504", "Image_Type" : "Digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 19184, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/19184", "Disp_Access_No" : "2008.110", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "2000", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "2000", "_Disp_End_Date" : "2000", "Disp_Title" : "Untitled, from Serie Piedras [Rock Series]", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Untitled, from Serie Piedras [Rock Series]", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Kcho", "Sort_Artist" : "Kcho", "Disp_Dimen" : "50.1 cm x 65.3 cm (19 3/4 in. x 25 11/16 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "50.1 cm", "Disp_Width" : "65.3 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Ink on paper", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Ink on paper", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Best known for his large-scale installations and sculptures, Kcho uses commonplace objects such as oars, boats, and debris from his native Cuba in his works. These humble materials allude to the massive migration of Cubans from that country following Fidel Castro’s rise to power. Kcho’s Serie piedras [Rock Series] translates this sculptural vocabulary onto paper. While avoiding a direct statement about Cuban emigration, the oversized rock crushing and shattering a wood table and oar clearly references the dangers faced by Cubans who attempt to flee the country by sea.", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of Fran Magee, 2008", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "drawing", "Creation_Place2" : "Cuban", "Department" : "Prints and Drawings; Latin American Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2008.110.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2008.110.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2008.110.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2008.110.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "13501", "Image_Type" : "Digital image", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 17351, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/17351", "Disp_Access_No" : "2005.24", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "0", "_Disp_End_Date" : "0", "Disp_Title" : "El libro de la vida [The Book of Life]", "Alt_Title" : "El libro de la nada [The Book of Nothing]", "Obj_Title" : "El libro de la vida [The Book of Life]", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Ricardo Rodríguez Brey", "Sort_Artist" : "Rodríguez Brey, Ricardo", "Disp_Dimen" : "42.5 cm x 55.9 cm (16 3/4 in. x 22 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "42.5 cm", "Disp_Width" : "55.9 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Screenprint", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Screenprint", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Ricardo Rodríguez Brey’s, alludes to the anthropological and cultural histories of his own culture in his work. Brey juxtaposes manuscripts of explorers, scientists, and early European writings on the Americas with imagery of Afro-Cuban culture. The positioning of these amongst each other creates a tension between the realities of the explorers versus the reality of the Afro-Cuban culture (a theme often found in the Latin American novel). In El libro de la vida, Brey uses pages from other books or journals to create his own work that appears to be an open page. The printed text in the center of the work is from a book of personal narratives on travel and exploration in South America by Alexander de Humboldt and Aimé Bonpland. This passage describes traveling along a South American river at night and staying at a mission where they were greeted with surprising hospitality. Below this passage is an image of two human figures with a clear authority represented in the larger one. Brey’s use of the passage and image generates the tension mentioned above and opens a dialogue between image and text as well as artwork and audience.", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Fran Magee Fund, 2005", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "print", "Creation_Place2" : "Cuban", "Department" : "Prints and Drawings; Latin American Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ ] },{ "embark_ID" : 16848, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/16848", "Disp_Access_No" : "2003.84", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1997", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1997", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1997", "Disp_Title" : "Pescando en aguas internacionales [Fishing in International Waters]", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Pescando en aguas internacionales [Fishing in International Waters]", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Fernando Rodríguez", "Sort_Artist" : "Rodríguez, Fernando", "Disp_Dimen" : "56.5 cm x 76.4 cm (22 1/4 in. x 30 1/16 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "56.5 cm", "Disp_Width" : "76.4 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Watercolor, ink, and pencil on paper", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Watercolor, ink, and pencil on paper", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Much contemporary Cuban art deals explicitly with Cuba’s physical and political isolation. Rodríguez’s proposal for an installation takes this on with considerable humor. The artist developed an alter-ego in his work, a blind veteran of the Revolution called Francisco de la Cal, who in this watercolor is trying desperately to find an international context and response. For an island surrounded by water, the notion of “international waters” is a powerful one, particularly in light of the disputed and tragic ninety miles that separate the coasts of Cuba and Florida. ", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of Fran Magee and Gallery 106, 2003", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "drawing", "Creation_Place2" : "Cuban", "Department" : "Prints and Drawings; Latin American Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2003.84.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2003.84.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2003.84.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2003.84.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "2147", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 19601, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/19601", "Disp_Access_No" : "2010.96.1/2-2/2", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "2000", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "2000", "_Disp_End_Date" : "2000", "Disp_Title" : "La última cena, díptico II [The Last Supper, diptych II]", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "La última cena, díptico II [The Last Supper, diptych II]", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "José A. Toirac", "Sort_Artist" : "Toirac, José A.", "Disp_Dimen" : "96.5 cm x 259.1 cm (38 in. x 102 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "96.5 cm", "Disp_Width" : "259.1 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "outer dimension", "Medium" : "Acrylic", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Acrylic on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "For several years, Toirac has been investigating and deconstructing Cuba’s official media images. He has a fascination with repurposing and reclamation of popular media images. La última cena, diptico II (2000) is a still from a documentary about Fidel Castro’s visit to the United States in 1959. The dinner in this image is in a poor neighborhood at the Hotel Teresa. By blurring the precise photorealism in the second panel, the artist confuses the apparently stable documentary nature of the image and reclaims for painting the ability to produce a less black-and-white version of how history is told through images.", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of Fran Magee, 2010", "Copyright_Type" : "all approved.", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "painting", "Creation_Place2" : "Cuban", "Department" : "Latin American Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2010.96.1-2_2-2.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2010.96.1-2_2-2.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2010.96.1-2_2-2.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2010.96.1-2_2-2.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "8146", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 16851, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/16851", "Disp_Access_No" : "2003.86.1/7", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "2001", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "2001", "_Disp_End_Date" : "2001", "Disp_Title" : "Al futuro según Ars Magnesium: Relato de la ida por la vuelta [To the Future According to Ars Magnesium: Story of the Journey Through Its Return], ", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Al futuro según Ars Magnesium: Relato de la ida por la vuelta [To the Future According to Ars Magnesium: Story of the Journey Through Its Return]", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Tonel", "Sort_Artist" : "Tonel", "Disp_Dimen" : "26 cm x 17.5 cm (10 1/4 in. x 6 7/8 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "26 cm", "Disp_Width" : "17.5 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "image", "Medium" : "Ink, watercolor and collage on paper", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Ink, watercolor and collage on paper", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Tonel’s work fuses comic-book imagery with subtle political and cultural references. Here he tells a fantastic story that jumps from a seventeenth-century alchemical text to the year 2058. Vladimir Lenin, Antonio Gramsci, and Vladimir Mayakovski all make appearances, as does the Cuban “timba” music band NG La Banda. Tonel uses specific Cuban idioms and expressions throughout the text, as though telling the history of the Russian Revolution through Cuban popular culture. The narrative also weaves in and out of writing, collage, stamps, banknotes, and other appropriated elements. 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