{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 307, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/307", "Disp_Access_No" : "P1966.1.35/35", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1964", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1964", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1964", "Disp_Title" : "Rank, from XXXIV Drawings for Dante's Inferno", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Rank", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Robert Rauschenberg", "Sort_Artist" : "Rauschenberg, Robert", "Disp_Dimen" : "39.8 cm x 40.9 cm (15 11/16 in. x 16 1/8 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "39.8 cm", "Disp_Width" : "40.9 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "Sheet", "Medium" : "Photolithograph", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Photolithograph", "Info_Page_Comm" : "With the invention of photolithography any image could easily be made into a lithograph. A light sensitive emulsion, exposed to light through a photographic negative replaces the greasy crayon on stone. No other artist is more identified with photolithography than Rauschenberg, who appreciated its lack of established tradition and emphasized the commercial associations of the flatness and the dot matrix to adapt it to the interests of Pop art. ", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Archer M. Huntington Museum Fund, 1966", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "print", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "Prints and Drawings; American and Contemporary Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/P1966.1.35-35.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/P1966.1.35-35.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/P1966.1.35-35.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/P1966.1.35-35.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "6181", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }