{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 8482, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/8482", "Disp_Access_No" : "2000.51", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1771", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1771", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1771", "Disp_Title" : "The Female Consultation on the Blessed Medicine", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "The Female Consultation on the Blessed Medicine", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Anonymous", "Sort_Artist" : "Anonymous", "Disp_Dimen" : "23 cm x 15.5 cm (9 1/16 in. x 6 1/8 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "23 cm", "Disp_Width" : "15.5 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "Sheet", "Medium" : "Mezzotint with burin", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Mezzotint with burin", "Info_Page_Comm" : "“Blessed medicine” is a euphemism for the treatment of syphilis, putting the probity of these women into question. Practically from the origin of the medium, anonymous printmakers conveyed subjects of everyday concern using rudimentary techniques. Occasionally, such popular subjects have appeared in “artistic” works. Over the course of the eighteenth-century, and especially in England, this upward migration became more common. This print, done in the most sophisticated technique of the day––mezzotint––is a choice example.", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, The Karen G. and Dr. Elgin W. Ware, Jr. Collection, 2000", "Copyright_Type" : "Public domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "print", "Creation_Place2" : "English", "Department" : "Prints and Drawings", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2000.51.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2000.51.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2000.51.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2000.51.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "9054", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }