{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 1771, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/1771", "Disp_Access_No" : "P1962.9", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1815-1816 (p. 1905)", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1815", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1816", "Disp_Title" : "Modo con que los antiguos españoles cazaban los toros á caballo en el campo [The Way in Which the Ancient Spaniards Hunted Bulls on Horseback in the Open Country], plate 1 from La Tauromaquia", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Modo con que los antiguos españoles cazaban los toros á caballo en el campo [The Way in Which the Ancient Spaniards Hunted Bulls on Horseback in the Open Country], plate 1 from La Tauromaquia", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Francisco de Goya y Lucientes", "Sort_Artist" : "Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de", "Disp_Dimen" : "25.7 cm x 35.85 cm (10 1/8 in. x 14 1/8 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "25.7 cm", "Disp_Width" : "35.85 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "Sheet", "Medium" : "Etching, burnished aquatint and drypoint", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Etching, burnished aquatint and drypoint", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In 1816, Goya announced the publication of “thirty-three prints that represent different maneuvers and positions in the art of contesting with bulls.” La Tauromaquia––The Bullfight––presents some of the great figures and moments of Spain’s national pastime. Goya’s choice of subject was guided by the poet Don Nicoás Fernandez de Moratín’s brief history of bullfighting, published in Madrid in 1777, and by a manual attributed to the most famous matador of the time, Pepe Illo, published in Cádiz in 1796. While the intention and the imagery of the series are the most conventional of Goya’s print series, the Tauromaquia nevertheless involves a radical and fairly subversive critique. In these works Goya celebrates the power and nobility of the bull rather than the people portrayed, anticipating the sensibility of French Romantics like Géricault and Delacroix. Similarly, the amorphous space and flat patterning of his compositions are personal and unexpected, predicting elements in the style of critical early modernists, notably Manet. Faithful to the poet Moratin’s history of bulls and bullfighting in Spain, the first plates of the Tauromaquia illustrate the origins of the sport. Here, men on horseback and on foot bring down a wild bull.", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, University Purchase, 1962", "Copyright_Type" : "public domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "print", "Creation_Place2" : "Spanish", "Department" : "Prints and Drawings", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/P1962.9.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/P1962.9.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/P1962.9.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/P1962.9.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "4920", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 1772, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/1772", "Disp_Access_No" : "P1962.10", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1815-1816 (p. 1905)", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1815", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1816", "Disp_Title" : "Pepe Illo haciendo el recorte al toro [Pepe Illo making the pass of the 'recorte'], plate 29 from La Tauromaquia", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Pepe Illo haciendo el recorte al toro [Pepe Illo making the pass of the 'recorte'], plate 29 from La Tauromaquia", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Francisco de Goya y Lucientes", "Sort_Artist" : "Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de", "Disp_Dimen" : "25.1 cm x 35.85 cm (9 7/8 in. x 14 1/8 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "25.1 cm", "Disp_Width" : "35.85 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "Sheet", "Medium" : "Etching, burnished aquatint, drypoint and burin", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Etching, burnished aquatint, drypoint and burin", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In 1816, Goya announced the publication of “thirty-three prints that represent different maneuvers and positions in the art of contesting with bulls.” La Tauromaquia––The Bullfight––presents some of the great figures and moments of Spain’s national pastime. Goya’s choice of subject was guided by the poet Don Nicoás Fernandez de Moratín’s brief history of bullfighting, published in Madrid in 1777, and by a manual attributed to the most famous matador of the time, Pepe Illo, published in Cádiz in 1796. While the intention and the imagery of the series are the most conventional of Goya’s print series, the Tauromaquia nevertheless involves a radical and fairly subversive critique. In these works Goya celebrates the power and nobility of the bull rather than the people portrayed, anticipating the sensibility of French Romantics like Géricault and Delacroix. Similarly, the amorphous space and flat patterning of his compositions are personal and unexpected, predicting elements in the style of critical early modernists, notably Manet. Pepe Illo was the most famous matador in Seville and the author of a manual on bullfighting published in 1796. His manual recounts this scene, in which he guides the bull into a characteristic “curtsy,” and responds with a bow of respect. ", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, University Purchase, 1962", "Copyright_Type" : "public domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "print", "Creation_Place2" : "Spanish", "Department" : "Prints and Drawings", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/P1962.10.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/P1962.10.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/P1962.10.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/P1962.10.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "4919", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 1773, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/1773", "Disp_Access_No" : "P1962.12", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1815-1816 (p. 1905)", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1815", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1816", "Disp_Title" : "Cogida de un moro estando en la plaza [A Moor Caught by the Bull in the Ring], plate 8 from La Tauromaquia", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Cogida de un moro estando en la plaza [A Moor Caught by the Bull in the Ring], plate 8 from La Tauromaquia", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Francisco de Goya y Lucientes", "Sort_Artist" : "Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de", "Disp_Dimen" : "25.1 cm x 35.85 cm (9 7/8 in. x 14 1/8 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "25.1 cm", "Disp_Width" : "35.85 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "Sheet", "Medium" : "Etching, burnished aquatint and drypoint", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Etching, burnished aquatint and drypoint", "Info_Page_Comm" : "In 1816, Goya announced the publication of “thirty-three prints that represent different maneuvers and positions in the art of contesting with bulls.” La Tauromaquia––The Bullfight––presents some of the great figures and moments of Spain’s national pastime. Goya’s choice of subject was guided by the poet Don Nicoás Fernandez de Moratín’s brief history of bullfighting, published in Madrid in 1777, and by a manual attributed to the most famous matador of the time, Pepe Illo, published in Cádiz in 1796. While the intention and the imagery of the series are the most conventional of Goya’s print series, the Tauromaquia nevertheless involves a radical and fairly subversive critique. In these works Goya celebrates the power and nobility of the bull rather than the people portrayed, anticipating the sensibility of French Romantics like Géricault and Delacroix. Similarly, the amorphous space and flat patterning of his compositions are personal and unexpected, predicting elements in the style of critical early modernists, notably Manet. The physical power and indomitable spirit of the bull is a theme throughout the Tauromaquia. There are numerous scenes of matadors gored or killed in the ring, but not one with the mighty beast completely subdued or felled. Especially abbreviated in the description of surroundings and flat in the depiction of space, this plate may have been unfinished. ", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, University Purchase, 1962", "Copyright_Type" : "public domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "print", "Creation_Place2" : "Spanish", "Department" : "Prints and Drawings", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/P1962.12.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/P1962.12.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/P1962.12.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/P1962.12.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "4921", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 1774, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/1774", "Disp_Access_No" : "P1962.13", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1816 (p. 1905)", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1816", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1816", "Disp_Title" : "Dos grupos de picadores arrollados de seguida por un solo toro [Two Teams of Picadors Thrown One After the Other by a Single Bull], plate 32 from La Tauromaquia", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Dos grupos de picadores arrollados de seguida por un solo toro [Two Teams of Picadors Thrown One After the Other by a Single Bull], plate 32 from La Tauromaquia", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Francisco de Goya y Lucientes", "Sort_Artist" : "Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de", "Disp_Dimen" : "29.85 cm x 46.75 cm (11 3/4 in. x 18 3/8 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "29.85 cm", "Disp_Width" : "46.75 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "Sheet", "Medium" : "Etching, burnished aquatint, drypoint and burin", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Etching, burnished aquatint, drypoint and burin", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, University Purchase, 1962", "Copyright_Type" : "public domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "print", "Creation_Place2" : "Spanish", "Department" : "Prints and Drawings", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/P1962.13.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/P1962.13.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/P1962.13.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/P1962.13.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "6196", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 3731, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/3731", "Disp_Access_No" : "G1966.2.210", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1797-1799 (p. 1890-1900)", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1797", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1799", "Disp_Title" : "Devota profesion [Devout Profession], plate 70 from Los Caprichos", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Devota profesion [Devout Profession], plate 70 from Los Caprichos", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Francisco de Goya y Lucientes", "Sort_Artist" : "Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de", "Disp_Dimen" : "34.3 cm x 24.3 cm (13 1/2 in. x 9 9/16 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "34.3 cm", "Disp_Width" : "24.3 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "Sheet", "Medium" : "Etching, aquatint and drypoint", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Etching, aquatint and drypoint", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The earliest of Goya’s four major print series by more than decade, the Caprichos were created in 1797-98. Free inventions, thus “caprices,” their eighty plates comment upon the tension between society and the individual, between ideals and realities, between belief and reason. Injustice, hypocrisy, and superstition are Goya’s principal targets; caricature, satire, and sarcasm his favorite weapons. In addition to the printed titles, a manuscript in the Prado Museum purportedly written by Goya elucidates the meaning of individual prints. The imagery of the Caprichos is rich with references, from established iconography to folk literature, songs, and sayings. But the series is above all original in the modern sense: the product of an individual and unfettered imagination. The Caprichos are also the first great demonstration of the expressive possibilities of aquatint, which had previously been used for reproducing the appearance of drawings. First published in 1799 they along with the Tauromaquia were the only series released during the artist’s lifetime. Retaining the plates, the Royal Academy in Madrid issued eleven more editions between 1855 and 1937, making the Caprichos the most widely circulated and best known of Goya’s prints. The Prado manuscript gives a detailed script of this scene of witchcraft: “Will you swear to obey and respect your masters and superiors, to sweep the garrets, to spin, to ring bells, to howl, to yell, to fly, to cook, to grease, to suck, to bake, to blow, to fry, everything and whatever time you are ordered to?” “I swear.” “Well then, my girl, you are now a witch. Congratulations.” ", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of the children of L.M. Tonkin, 1966", "Copyright_Type" : "public domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "print", "Creation_Place2" : "Spanish", "Department" : "Prints and Drawings", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/G1966.2.210.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/G1966.2.210.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/G1966.2.210.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/G1966.2.210.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "4922", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 3979, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/3979", "Disp_Access_No" : "G1966.2.286", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1797-1799 (p. 1890-1900)", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1797", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1799", "Disp_Title" : "Muchachos al avío [Lads Making Ready], plate 11 from Los Caprichos", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Muchachos al avío [Lads Making Ready], plate 11 from Los Caprichos", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Francisco de Goya y Lucientes", "Sort_Artist" : "Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de", "Disp_Dimen" : "34.15 cm x 24.1 cm (13 7/16 in. x 9 1/2 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "34.15 cm", "Disp_Width" : "24.1 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "Sheet", "Medium" : "Etching, burnished aquatint and burin", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Etching, burnished aquatint and burin", "Info_Page_Comm" : "The earliest of Goya’s four major print series by more than decade, the Caprichos were created in 1797-98. Free inventions, thus “caprices,” their eighty plates comment upon the tension betweensociety and the individual, between ideals and realities, between belief and reason. Injustice, hypocrisy, and superstition are Goya’s principal targets; caricature, satire, and sarcasm his favorite weapons. In addition to the printed titles, a manuscript in the Prado Museum purportedly written by Goya elucidates the meaning of individual prints. The imagery of the Caprichos is rich with references, from established iconography to folk literature, songs, and sayings. But the series is above all original in the modern sense: the product of an individual and unfettered imagination. The Caprichos are also the first great demonstration of the expressive possibilities of aquatint, which had previously been used for reproducing the appearance of drawings. First published in 1799 they along with the Tauromaquia were the only series released during the artist’s lifetime. Retaining the plates, the Royal Academy in Madrid issued eleven more editions between 1855 and 1937, making the Caprichos the most widely circulated and best known of Goya’s prints. A group of youths slouch in a stark landscape. The inscription “wild merchants” on a preparatory drawing in the Prado Museum suggests that they are smugglers. Goya’s commentary is simpler: “Their faces and their clothes make it clear what they are.” Unfortunately, the areas of aquatint have become worn in this impression, lightening the night sky and the shadows, diminishing the print’s sense of menace.", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of the children of L.M. Tonkin, 1966", "Copyright_Type" : "public domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "print", "Creation_Place2" : "Spanish", "Department" : "Prints and Drawings", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/G1966.2.286.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/G1966.2.286.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/G1966.2.286.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/G1966.2.286.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "4810", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 8661, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/8661", "Disp_Access_No" : "U12", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1797-1798 (p. 1868)", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1797", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1798", "Disp_Title" : "Despacha, que dispiértan [Be Quick, They Are Waking Up], plate 78 from Los Caprichos", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Despacha, que dispiértan [Be Quick, They Are Waking Up], plate 78 from Los Caprichos", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Francisco de Goya y Lucientes", "Sort_Artist" : "Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de", "Disp_Dimen" : "31.15 cm x 22.5 cm (12 1/4 in. x 8 7/8 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "31.15 cm", "Disp_Width" : "22.5 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "Sheet", "Medium" : "Etching and burnished aquatint", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Etching and burnished aquatint", "Info_Page_Comm" : "", "Dedication" : "Undetermined Source", "Copyright_Type" : "Public domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "print", "Creation_Place2" : "Spanish", "Department" : "Prints and Drawings", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/U12.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/U12.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/U12.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/U12.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "8319", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 8663, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/8663", "Disp_Access_No" : "1998.70", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1797-1799", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1797", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1799", "Disp_Title" : "De que mal morira? [Of What Ill Will He Die?], plate 40 from Los Caprichos", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "De que mal morira? [Of What Ill Will He Die?], plate 40 from Los Caprichos", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Francisco de Goya y Lucientes", "Sort_Artist" : "Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de", "Disp_Dimen" : "30.7 cm x 21.3 cm (12 1/16 in. x 8 3/8 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "30.7 cm", "Disp_Width" : "21.3 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "Sheet", "Medium" : "Etching and aquatint", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Etching and aquatint", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Goya used irony and satire to explain countless aspects of the human condition in his famous series Los Capricios. Based on Spanish folklore, the precise meaning of many of the images in this series continues to elude scholars. Nonetheless, it is clear that one of the sub-themes of the series concerns donkeys, in their bestial dumbness and proverbial stubbornness, in human roles. In this print, the doctor is the victim of Goya's satiric wit. A donkey, dressed in a contemporary doctor's outfit that includes gentlemen's shoes, sits at the bedside of a patient whose pulse he takes. The patient, whose hand is limp, looks gravely ill and in dire need of a doctor. The patient's loved ones, silhouetted in the background, anxiously await the report of four-legged, medical expert summoned to the sickbed. As the title underscores, it is not clear whether the patient will die from the illness or this doctor's treatment. ", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, The Karen G. and Dr. Elgin W. Ware, Jr. Collection, 1998", "Copyright_Type" : "public domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "print", "Creation_Place2" : "Spanish", "Department" : "Prints and Drawings", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/1998.70.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/1998.70.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/1998.70.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/1998.70.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "4905", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 10988, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/10988", "Disp_Access_No" : "2002.1422", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "circa 1814 (p. 1867)", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1809", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1819", "Disp_Title" : "Tan bárbara la seguridad como el delito [The Custody is as Barbarous as the Crime] (Little Prisoner)", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Tan bárbara la seguridad como el delito [The Custody is as Barbarous as the Crime] (Little Prisoner)", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Francisco de Goya y Lucientes", "Sort_Artist" : "Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de", "Disp_Dimen" : "25 cm x 16.8 cm (9 13/16 in. x 6 5/8 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "25 cm", "Disp_Width" : "16.8 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Etching and burin", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Etching and burin", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Goya began working on his last series of etchings around 1815. When he departed for Bordeaux in 1824, he left twenty-two plates with his son Javier. Eighteen of the plates were published for the first time in Paris in 1864 under the title of Los Proverbios—The Proverbs. The other four plates, which had been separated around 1844, were re-discovered in 1877 and published in the French journal L’Art. Since the word “disparate,” translatable as folly, appears in the captions that Goya himself inscribed on a group of working proofs, the series is alternately called Los Disparates. Their imagery is the most complex and their meaning the most illusive of Goya’s series. The broad themes are still those of the Caprichos, but reason seems to have been completely overwhelmed and the prints are full of nightmarish visions. The Little Prisoner is one of three small etchings of single figures, faceless and perfectly hopeless in their confinement. Ostensibly separate from a larger series, they resemble the Desastres de la Guerra in spirit and technique. In at least one instance, working proofs of the Prisoners and the Desastres were bound together in an album, demonstrating that Goya himself saw them as related. ", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, The Leo Steinberg Collection, 2002", "Copyright_Type" : "public domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "print", "Creation_Place2" : "Spanish", "Department" : "Prints and Drawings", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2002.1422.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2002.1422.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2002.1422.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2002.1422.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "4906", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 11368, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/11368", "Disp_Access_No" : "1992.239", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "circa 1824-1826 (p. 1859)", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1824", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1826", "Disp_Title" : "El Embozado [The Cloaked Man] or El Torero anciano [The Old Bullfighter]", "Alt_Title" : "El Embozado", "Obj_Title" : "El Embozado [The Cloaked Man] or El Torero anciano [The Old Bullfighter]", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Francisco de Goya y Lucientes", "Sort_Artist" : "Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de", "Disp_Dimen" : "25.2 cm x 18.9 cm (9 15/16 in. x 7 7/16 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "25.2 cm", "Disp_Width" : "18.9 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "Sheet", "Medium" : "Etching with posthumous drypoint additions ", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Etching with posthumous drypoint additions ", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Goya began working on his last series of etchings around 1815. When he departed for Bordeaux in 1824, he left twenty-two plates with his son Javier. Eighteen of the plates were published for the first time in Paris in 1864 under the title of Los Proverbios—The Proverbs. The other four plates, which had been separated around 1844, were re-discovered in 1877 and published in the French journal L’Art. Since the word “disparate,” translatable as folly, appears in the captions that Goya himself inscribed on a group of working proofs, the series is alternately called Los Disparates. Their imagery is the most complex and their meaning the most illusive of Goya’s series. The broad themes are still those of the Caprichos, but reason seems to have been completely overwhelmed and the prints are full of nightmarish visions. This is one of seven etchings created by Goya during his last four years in exile in Bordeaux. The plates recall the format and types of the Caprichos, but with the vague settings and mysterious meanings of the Proverbios. (The bull in the background appears added by a later hand.) It may be that Goya conceived them as part of a new series of caprichos, which he then abandoned in favor of lithography. There exist just one contemporary proof and a handful of impressions from posthumous printings. ", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Archer M. Huntington Museum Fund, 1992", "Copyright_Type" : "public domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "print", "Creation_Place2" : "Spanish", "Department" : "Prints and Drawings", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/1992.239.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/1992.239.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/1992.239.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/1992.239.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "4801", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 12906, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/12906", "Disp_Access_No" : "2002.1428", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1797-1799 (p. 1799)", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1797", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1799", "Disp_Title" : "Despacha, que dispiértan [Be Quick, They Are Waking Up], plate 78 from Los Caprichos", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Despacha, que dispiértan [Be Quick, They Are Waking Up], plate 78 from Los Caprichos", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Francisco de Goya y Lucientes", "Sort_Artist" : "Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de", "Disp_Dimen" : "30.5 cm x 20.4 cm (12 in. x 8 1/16 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "30.5 cm", "Disp_Width" : "20.4 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Etching and burnished aquatint", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Etching and burnished aquatint", "Info_Page_Comm" : " The earliest of Goya’s four major print series by more than decade, the Caprichos were created in 1797-98. Free inventions, thus “caprices,” their eighty plates comment upon the tension betweensociety and the individual, between ideals and realities, between belief and reason. Injustice, hypocrisy, and superstition are Goya’s principal targets; caricature, satire, and sarcasm his favorite weapons. In addition to the printed titles, a manuscript in the Prado Museum purportedly written by Goya elucidates the meaning of individual prints. The imagery of the Caprichos is rich with references, from established iconography to folk literature, songs, and sayings. But the series is above all original in the modern sense: the product of an individual and unfettered imagination. The Caprichos are also the first great demonstration of the expressive possibilities of aquatint, which had previously been used for reproducing the appearance of drawings. First published in 1799 they along with the Tauromaquia were the only series released during the artist’s lifetime. Retaining the plates, the Royal Academy in Madrid issued eleven more editions between 1855 and 1937, making the Caprichos the most widely circulated and best known of Goya’s prints. Three rather earnest and unthreatening goblins work through the night to complete their tasks in a kitchen. Ridiculing belief in the supernatural, Goya explains, “The goblins are the most industrious and obliging people there are. As the maid keeps them happy, they scour the pot, cook the vegetables, wash up, sweep and hush the child. It has often been disputed whether they are devils or not; don’t let us deceive ourselves. Devils are those who spend their time doing harm, or hindering others from doing good, or doing nothing at all.” ", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, The Leo Steinberg Collection, 2002", "Copyright_Type" : "public domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "print", "Creation_Place2" : "Spanish", "Department" : "Prints and Drawings", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2002.1428.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2002.1428.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2002.1428.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2002.1428.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "4918", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 18852, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/18852", "Disp_Access_No" : "2007.38", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "circa 1816-1824 (p. 1828-1877)", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1816", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1824", "Disp_Title" : "Disparate conocido [Well-Known Folly], from Los Proverbios", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Disparate conocido [Well-Known Folly], from Los Proverbios", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Francisco de Goya y Lucientes", "Sort_Artist" : "Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de", "Disp_Dimen" : "27.7 cm x 37.5 cm (10 7/8 in. x 14 3/4 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "27.7 cm", "Disp_Width" : "37.5 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "sheet", "Medium" : "Etching and burnished aquatint", "Support" : "", "Disp_Medium" : "Etching and burnished aquatint", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Goya began working on his last series of etchings around 1815. When he departed for Bordeaux in 1824, he left twenty-two plates with his son Javier. Eighteen of the plates were published for the first time in Paris in 1864 under the title of Los Proverbios—The Proverbs. The other four plates, which had been separated around 1844, were re-discovered in 1877 and published in the French journal L’Art. Since the word “disparate,” translatable as folly, appears in the captions that Goya himself inscribed on a group of working proofs, the series is alternately called Los Disparates. Their imagery is the most complex and their meaning the most illusive of Goya’s series. The broad themes are still those of the Caprichos, but reason seems to have been completely overwhelmed and the prints are full of nightmarish visions. Threatened by a shrouded figure possibly holding a rifle and a shadowed one brandishing a sword, a group huddles while one offers a gleeful gesture of defiance. The great Goya scholar Tomás Harris associated this scene with the Spanish adage, “Dos a uno, meten la paja en el culo” [“If two to one, stuff your arse with straw”]. This is one of the four plates from the Proverbios that were re-discovered in 1877. A brilliant impression printed on thin Japanese paper, this proof precedes the first edition of these four additional plates. ", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Jack S. Blanton Curatorial Endowment Fund, 2007", "Copyright_Type" : "Public domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "print", "Creation_Place2" : "Spanish", "Department" : "Prints and Drawings", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/2007.38.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/2007.38.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/2007.38.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/2007.38.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "4470", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }