{ "objects" : [ { "embark_ID" : 14427, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/14427", "Disp_Access_No" : "1991.338", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1915", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1915", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1915", "Disp_Title" : "New York at Night", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "New York at Night", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Max Weber", "Sort_Artist" : "Weber, Max", "Disp_Dimen" : "87 cm x 55.9 cm (34 1/4 in. x 22 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "87 cm", "Disp_Width" : "55.9 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "canvas", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "canvas", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on canvas", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Max Weber was one of the first American artists to fully synthesize the principles of European modernism and adapt them to a specifically American subject matter. Well acquainted with the debates and practices of Gertrude Stein, Pablo Picasso, Henri Matisse, Henri Rousseau, and other leading European artists and intellectuals whom he met while living in Paris, Weber helped introduce their avant-garde ideas to artists working in the United States when he returned to New York. His own influential pulpit was Alfred Stieglitz’s journal Camera Work. In its pages he proposed his most important concept, the notion of a fourth dimension, or the extension of space into another realm beyond the three dimensions of the visible world. His speculative ideas found clear expression in the paintings he executed around 1910, which incorporated representations of movement and time. New York at Night, completed five years later, reduces his impressions of time and place to a basic vocabulary of colorful geometric shapes and intersecting planes seen from multiple perspectives and enhanced by illusions of motion and reverberating sound. In works like this, Weber conveyed the speed, the action, and the dynamic energy of the city more abstractly than ever before in American painting. ", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of Mari and James A. Michener, 1991", "Copyright_Type" : "public domain", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "American and Contemporary Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/1991.338.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/1991.338.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/1991.338.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/1991.338.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "1579", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 14472, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/14472", "Disp_Access_No" : "1991.275", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "circa 1940", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1935", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1945", "Disp_Title" : "Sidewalk Merchant", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Sidewalk Merchant", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Kenneth Hayes Miller", "Sort_Artist" : "Miller, Kenneth Hayes", "Disp_Dimen" : "91.5 cm x 115.9 cm (36 in. x 45 5/8 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "91.5 cm", "Disp_Width" : "115.9 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "Sight", "Medium" : "Oil", "Support" : "plywood", "Disp_Medium" : "Oil on plywood", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Muselike women in stylish hats, coats, and furs grace the street outside Kenneth Hayes Miller's studio. The Fourteenth Street studio was the center of the social realist painters of New York's art world, including Isabel Bishop, Moses and Raphael Soyer, and Reginald Marsh, all students of Miller at the Art Students League. The Fourteenth Street School depicted the urban social world, such as this everyday shopping spree. Miller's interest in social realism developed after World War I when he began to move away from the dreamlike images of his early work to try to capture the realities of daily life in the city. Sidewalk Merchant is one of Miller's most ambitious canvases, a work he began in 1932 and returned to sixteen years later to recompose and repaint. ", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of Mari and James A. Michener, 1991", "Copyright_Type" : "", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "American and Contemporary Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/1991.275.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/1991.275.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/1991.275.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/1991.275.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "1553", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/1991.275.mp3", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/1991.275.mp3", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/1991.275.mp3", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/1991.275.mp3", "IsPrimary" : "0", "_SurrogateID" : "8539", "Image_Type" : "audio", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "This is an excerpt from a tape James Michener made commenting on the source of paintings in his collection, probably recorded around 1968.", "View" : "" } , ] },{ "embark_ID" : 14488, "URL" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Objects-1/info/14488", "Disp_Access_No" : "1991.263", "_AccNumSort1" : "", "Disp_Create_DT" : "1931", "_Disp_Start_Dat" : "1931", "_Disp_End_Date" : "1931", "Disp_Title" : "Chatham Square", "Alt_Title" : "", "Obj_Title" : "Chatham Square", "Series_Title" : "", "Disp_Maker_1" : "Reginald Marsh", "Sort_Artist" : "Marsh, Reginald", "Disp_Dimen" : "120.1 cm x 89.6 cm (47 5/16 in. x 35 1/4 in.)", "Disp_Height" : "120.1 cm", "Disp_Width" : "89.6 cm", "Dimen_Extent" : "Sight", "Medium" : "Tempera and collaged canvas", "Support" : "board", "Disp_Medium" : "Tempera and collaged canvas on board", "Info_Page_Comm" : "Night has fallen on a commercial district in New York City. In the background a straggling shopper exits the doorway of a store, while in the foreground, an ordinary old man, perhaps homeless, leans on a pilaster. In Reginald Marsh’s Chatham Square, the near magical light of store windows illuminates a typical night of street hustle and bustle. The bum figure in the foreground of Chatham Square is a frequent model of Marsh’s. In this work, the figure appears to have been collaged onto the surface in an attempt to add both visual and thematic depth", "Dedication" : "Blanton Museum of Art, The University of Texas at Austin, Gift of Mari and James A. Michener, 1991", "Copyright_Type" : "approval on case by case basis", "Disp_Obj_Type" : "painting", "Creation_Place2" : "American", "Department" : "American and Contemporary Art", "Obj_Name" : "", "Period" : "", "Style" : "", "Edition" : "", "Curator" : "", "Images": [ { "ImagePath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/images/1991.263.tif", "ThumbnailPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Thumbnails/1991.263.tif", "PreviewPath" : "https://webkiosk.gallerysystems.com/Media/Previews/1991.263.tif", "IIIF_URL": "http://iiif.gallerysystems.com/1991.263.tif", "IsPrimary" : "1", "_SurrogateID" : "1551", "Image_Type" : "", "Photo_Credit" : "", "Remarks" : "", "View" : "" } , ] }, ] }